University of Florida

Michael E. Kane

Professor

Environmental Horticulture Dept.
University of Florida
Rm. 109 Bldg. 68, PO Box 110675
Gainesville FL 32611-0675

Phone: (352) 273-4500
Fax: (352) 392-1413
E-mail: micropro@ufl.edu

Curriculum Vitae

Specializations

Native Plant In-Vitro Ecology, Restoration Ecology

Professional Background

Education

  • Ph.D. Biological Sciences, Univ. Rhode Island, 1984
  • M.S. Botany (Aquatic Botany), Univ. Rhode Island, 1977
  • B.S. Natural Resources (Aquatic Plant Ecol.) Univ. Rhode Island, 1974

Faculty Appointment

30% teaching:70% research

Teaching

classroom Michael Kane teaches Micropropagation of Horticultural Crops, co-teaches Plant Propagation and ALS 5934 Graduate Professional Development Seminar. He has long been an advocate of enhancing graduate student professional development. In 2006, he was selected the fill the Marion and Virginia Roche Professorship of Teaching Excellence. One of the responsibilities of this position is to revise the procedures for peer teaching assessment in the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences.

Research

beach research Dr. Kane’s research is focused on development of in vitro propagation (micropropagation) systems for genotypic selection and production of aquatic/wetland, coastal plants and native orchids. The primary goal of his research is to develop environmentally sound production procedures for habitat restoration and plant reintroduction. He also examines genotypic effects on in vitro physiology and ex vitro field growth performance of micropropagated wetland and coastal plants in restored habitats. Delineation of genetic diversity within and between wetland and coastal plant populations is accomplished using DNA fingerprinting technology. Fundamental investigations of the environmental effects on and hormonal regulation of aquatic plant growth and development using in vitro culture techniques are also pursued. Research is conducted as part of the Plant Restoration Conservation and Propagation Biotechnology Program.

research